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"Angora Goats in the Midwest (Part 3)"

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Angora Goats in the Midwest (Part 3)

By: "R.M. Jordan, Extension Animal Specialist, Univ. of MN"

  • About the Author
  • Selecting Breeding Stock
    Mohair is the product sold, and inherited traits affect the amount, uniformity, fineness of grade, and lustre of the fleece. Under the same environment and feed circumstances, the amount of hair produced per goat annually can vary 6 to 8 pounds due to superior breeding. The official score card used in evaluating goats gives equal value to body traits and to fleece traits. Fleece traits seemingly warrant 60 percent of the emphasis.

    During the last ten years, several hundred Angora flocks have been established in the Midwest. However, only some 25 flocks of those are good sources of breeding stock.

    When buying breeding stock to upgrade and enhance the productivity of your flock, establish minimum goals. Select bucks (billies) as yearlings with good size and conformation with fleece production records for the first two shearings. Select bucks from the top 20 percent of the crop that have sheared a minimum of 12 pounds in the two kid clips. In the fall, yearling does should weigh about 60 pounds and should have sheared a minimum of 10 pounds of hair in the first two kid clips. Try to develop a flock that will produce 16 to 20 pounds of hair annually rather than 10 to 14 pounds.

    Recognize that while big Angora goats produce more kids and more hair, their hair is usually coarser, and is less valuable per pound. In the last 2 or 3 years, coarse hair has been in less demand. Therefore, a flock improvement program that includes the use of bucks with finer hair (micron of 35 to 38 rather than 42 to 45) may be in order.

    Figure 2. Growth pattern and daily feed intake of drylot-fed Angora kids.

    Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3 - Part 4 - Part 5 - Part 6 - Part 7 - Part 8

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    About the author: North Central Regional Extension Publications are subject to peer review and prepared as a part of the Cooperative Extension activities of the thirteen land-grant universities of the 12 North Central States, in cooperation with the Extension Service-U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.

    pubs@unl.edu

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    ANGORA GOATS IN THE MIDWEST

    About the Author

    About the author:
    North Central Regional Extension Publications are subject to peer review and prepared as a part of the Cooperative Extension activities of the thirteen land-grant universities of the 12 North Central States, in cooperation with the Extension Service-U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. The following states cooperated in making this publication available:
    University of Illinois
    69 Mumford Hall
    1301 W. Gregory Drive
    Urbana, IL 61801
    217-333-2007
    Iowa State University
    112 Printing Publ. Bldg.
    Ames, IA 50011-1050
    515-294-5247
    Michigan State University
    10B. Ag. Hall
    East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
    517-355-0240
    *University of Minnesota
    3 Coffey Hall
    St. Paul, MN 55108
    612-625-8173
    University of Nebraska
    Dept. of Ag. Communications
    Lincoln, NE 68583-0918
    402-472-3023
    North Dakota State University
    Ag. Comm., Box 5655, Morrill Hall
    Fargo, ND 58105
    701-237-7881
    South Dakota State University
    Ag. Comm. Center, Box 2231
    Brookings, SD 57007
    605-688-5628
    *Publishing state
    For copies of this and other North Central Regional Extension Publications, write to: Publications Office, Cooperative Extension Service, in care of the University listed above for your state. If they do not have copies or your state is not listed above, contact the publishing state as specified.
    R. M. Jordan is an extension animal scientist-horses/sheep, Minnesota Extension Service and a professor, Department of Animal Science.

    Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Kenneth R. Bolen, Director of Cooperative Extension, University of Nebraska, Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
    University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension educational programs abide with the non-discrimination policies of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture.
    Programs and activities of the Cooperative Extension Service are available to all potential clientele without regard to race, color, sex, national origin, or handicap.

    In cooperation with NCR Educational Materials Project.

    Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Cooperative Extension Services of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Patrick J. Borich, Director of Minnesota Extension Service, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota 55108


    RP375
    pubs@unl.edu

    Agricultural Research Service

    Email: Contact INFO
    Telephone: Contact INFO
    Designed & Hosted by: JOLLY GERMAN
    ©1999-2017 GoatWorld.Com
    All written, audio, video and graphic material contained within this site, except where otherwise noted, is Copyrighted ©1999-2017. Some content may also be the property of contributors to the site, in which case their material is also protected by applicable copyright laws and this copyright policy. No material may be linked directly to or reproduced in any form without written permission. If you would like to reprint something from our site, simply send us an email to request permission to do so. Please refer to our REPRINT criteria.
    ©Gary Pfalzbot, Colorado, USA
    This site is run and operated by a Disabled Veteran